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Kolap Angkor Restaurant at St.55, Pasteur Street, Phnom Penh, Cambodia

Angeline Thursday, August 17, 2017 , , , , ,


Cambodian food is perhaps the most overlooked of all Asian cuisines. Cambodian emphasised on balance of flavours between salty, sour and sweetness. Khmer food leans towards the sweeter side, from the marinated grilled pork, to the chilli pastes, even iced coffees is noticeable heavy of sweetness. Living in Cambodia give me a chance to learn about their cuisine and cultures.

Kolap Angkor Restaurant
St.55 Pasteur Street,
Phnom Penh, Cambodia.
 
No breakfast is complete without a beverage. Hot tea is always serve with meal. Black coffee sweetened with condensed milk. A strange way to finish here is to pour hot tea into the leftover watery remains of the iced coffee but the combination actually works surprisingly well with the tea. Many dishes that are widely known as Vietnamese are also common in Cambodia. In Vietnam sandwiches are called banh mi, it's as popular in Cambodia and is called num pang pate. Cambodian dishes are quite similar to Thai food, but contain less chili, less sugar and less coconut milk.
Pork Noodle (9000 Riel)
Omelette with baguette (8000 Riel) 
 
Coffees (7000 Riel)
Rice and noodles are typical Cambodian breakfast. One of their favourite breakfast is pork or beef soup noodle.  Grilled Pork with rice is also one of Cambodian favourite breakfast option to start their day. Snacking on street food is a popular Cambodian pastime. If you’re worried about getting stomachache, choose street foods that are cook in front of you and served hot, which kills off bacteria. Ice in Cambodia is also usually safe, it’s made in ice factories. Snack in late morning through afternoon are usually fresh cut-up fruit served with spicy sweet sauce. Late afternoon snack will be barbecued beef skewers tucked into baguettes and topped with a green mango slaw and fried food. "Kar-fe toek doh koh toek gok" Iced coffee with sweetened condensed milk are widely available on the street stalls. You’ll find many vendors pushing carts around town and at small restaurants that set up shop on the sidewalk. For me, street food is a great way to learn about local fare and usually cost no more than $1.
 
 
 

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