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ALL FIT One Club Fit All @ Blue Seven, Penampang

Angeline Thursday, March 1, 2012 , ,


Join our class to get in-shape, read on for more health and fitness information and check on our November class schedule. We'll see you in ALL FIT!!! ALL FIT believes fitness is a lifestyle, a way to stay in shape and improving your health. Whether your goal is to improving your health, weight loss, body building or just want to look and feel better; they're here for you! ALL FIT can offer cutting edge exercise options, from personal training to indoor cycling classes, pilates, yoga, zumba, circuit training and other group fitness classes.

ALL FIT at Blue Seven
Batu 4, Jalan Penampang
88100 Kota Kinabalu.
Tel: 088-701 828
Website: www.allfit.my
Facilities: Aerobic Studio, Yoga Studio, Indoor Cycling Studio, Boxing/Muai Thai Ring (Training area), Children Room, Female and Male Room with sauna and steam room, Cardio Area, Free Weights and Weights Machine Area.
Fitness Equipments: Hoist Fitness, Xtrack, Schwinn, Maxxus
December 2012 Class Schedule for ALL FIT
(for a better version go to ALL FIT FB Page)

Angeline - Flow Yoga on Wednesday (9:00am -10:00am)
Angeline will always team teach with Monica, featuring in every Monica yoga classes


Monica - Yoga classes available everyday, once in the morning and evening. Please check schedule for time

We help you get in-shape, more supple and stay healthy!


Angeline and Jack - Cycle Attack class, a hardcore endurance training cycle will help you burn some extra calories. Cycle Attack available on Monday 6:30pm, Tuesday 9:00am, Friday 6:30pm, Saturday 10:00am and Sunday 3:00pm.


or Cycle Pro by JC/ Dorris/ Michelle (Please check schedule for more info)

You can also hire a great Personal Trainer at ALL FIT

ALL FIT offer Great Customer Services

KickPro and Personal Muai Thai Session also available at ALL FIT

Health and Fitness information






Correct position for downward dog


Forward Bend stretches many parts of the body



Information about Core Muscles from my teacher...please read on
Most people think of the core as a nice six-pack, or toned abs, but the truth is that the abdominal muscles are a very small part of the core. When we say ‘Core Muscles’ we speak of many different muscles that stabilize the spine and pelvis, and run the entire length of the torso. When these muscles contract, they stabilize the spine, pelvis and shoulder girdle and create a solid base of support. Training core muscles also helps in correcting postural imbalances which lead to injuries. Deep muscles help control movements, transfer energy, shift body weight and move in any direction as well as protects the back. Let’s look at these deep core muscles closely and their function and exercises to activate them.

MULTIFIDUS
The multifidus is a long series of thin muscles that are attached to the spine from your sacrum to the base of your neck. They work as a single unit to stabilize your spine as you move your body in different directions. Having a strong and stable multifidus and other deep stabilizing muscles can reduce your risk of back and hip pain. Most exercises that primarily engage your body weight or free weights can help you strengthen the lumbar region of the multifidus.

ONE ARM DUMBBELL OVER HEAD SQUATS are great to stabilize the spine strengthening the multifidus. Stand with your feel shoulder-width apart and hold a dumbbell over your head in your left hand. Squat down slowly as low as you can, keeping your torso upright and your feet and knees pointing forward. Look up at the dumbbell as you move. Put your right hand on the ground between your legs. Hold this squat position for one or two deep breaths. Repeat the same on the other side.

ROTATIONAL SIDE PLANK – Start in a plank position (Push up position) On the balls of your feet and elbows extended with your wrist, elbow and shoulders in one line and spine neutral. Take a deep breath in and as you exhale lift your right hand off the floor turning to the side into a side plank with your right hand perpendicular to the floor. Inhaling slowly drop the right hand back on the floor into a plank and exhaling lift the left hand off transitioning into a side plank on the other side. Perform 8-10 repetitions on each side.

PELVIC FLOOR MUSCLES:
The pelvic floor muscles are located between your legs, and run from your pubic bone at the front to the base of your spine at the back. They hold your bladder and urethra in place. The pelvic floor muscles give you control over your bladder and are used to urinate. They relax at the same time as the bladder contracts (tightens) in order to let the urine out. As you get older, your pelvic floor muscles get weaker. Women who have had children may also find they have weaker pelvic floor muscles. Weakened pelvic muscles can cause problems, such as urinary incontinence (being unable to control when you pass urine) and reduced sensitivity (feeling) during sex.

Activation your pelvic floor muscles - This is executed by contracting the same muscles and movement as you would when stopping the flow of urine. Breathe freely during the exercise and try not to engage your abdominal muscles while contracting your pelvic muscles. Try incorporating the activation of pelvic floor muscles while performing key core exercises like the plank, bridge, bird dog even Squats.
QUADRATUS LUMBORUM
The quadrates lumborum originates at the iliac crest and inserts into the last rib. It’s a large muscle in the middle & Lower back. You use this portion of your back when you bend over to the side and pick something up. You also activate your quadratus lumborum when you sit, stand or walk. Quadratus Lumborum has two muscle functions: to hold your lowest rib steady as you breathe and to flex the body's torso to each side of the body.
You can strengthen your quadratus lumborum muscle using the "side plank" exercise. And stretch this muscle with “cat and camel” exercise
Transversus abdominis aka (TVA):
Originates from the inguinal ligament, iliac crest, thoraco lumbar facia and rib 7th to 12th. And inserts xiphoid process, linea Alba, pubic crest. To simplify this in layman’s term, the transverse abs run from our sides to the front its fibers running horizontally. The transverses abdominis (TVA) helps to compress the ribs and viscera, providing thoracic and pelvic stability.
TVA muscles can be activated by imagining the analogy ‘Getting ready to be punched in the stomach’. So you not going to suck the belly in creating a vacuum, but compress the abdominals tightening it like a defense. The TVA muscles can be strengthened in any / every exercise (even during walking OR sitting upright) just by activating them in the above mentioned method. Try activating the TVA in key core exercises like the plank, bridge, bird dog etc to maximize benefits

Photo: Most people think of the core as a nice six-pack, or toned abs, but the truth is that the abdominal muscles are a very small part of the core. When we say ‘Core Muscles’ we speak of many different muscles that stabilize the spine and pelvis, and run the entire length of the torso. When these muscles contract, they stabilize the spine, pelvis and shoulder girdle and create a solid base of support. Training core muscles also helps in correcting postural imbalances which lead to injuries. Deep muscles help control movements, transfer energy, shift body weight and move in any direction as well as protects the back. Let’s look at these deep core muscles closely and their function and exercises to activate them.

MULTIFIDUS

The multifidus is a long series of thin muscles that are attached to the spine from your sacrum to the base of your neck. They work as a single unit to stabilize your spine as you move your body in different directions. Having a strong and stable multifidus and other deep stabilizing muscles can reduce your risk of back and hip pain. Most exercises that primarily engage your body weight or free weights can help you strengthen the lumbar region of the multifidus.

ONE ARM DUMBBELL OVER HEAD SQUATS are great to stabilize the spine strengthening the multifidus. Stand with your feel shoulder-width apart and hold a dumbbell over your head in your left hand. Squat down slowly as low as you can, keeping your torso upright and your feet and knees pointing forward. Look up at the dumbbell as you move. Put your right hand on the ground between your legs. Hold this squat position for one or two deep breaths. Repeat the same on the other side.

ROTATIONAL SIDE PLANK – Start in a plank position (Push up position) On the balls of your feet and elbows extended with your wrist, elbow and shoulders in one line and spine neutral. Take a deep breath in and as you exhale lift your right hand off the floor turning to the side into a side plank with your right hand perpendicular to the floor. Inhaling slowly drop the right hand back on the floor into a plank and exhaling lift the left hand off transitioning into a side plank on the other side. Perform 8-10 repetitions on each side.

PELVIC FLOOR MUSCLES:

The pelvic floor muscles are located between your legs, and run from your pubic bone at the front to the base of your spine at the back. They hold your bladder and urethra in place. The pelvic floor muscles give you control over your bladder and are used to urinate. They relax at the same time as the bladder contracts (tightens) in order to let the urine out. As you get older, your pelvic floor muscles get weaker. Women who have had children may also find they have weaker pelvic floor muscles. Weakened pelvic muscles can cause problems, such as urinary incontinence (being unable to control when you pass urine) and reduced sensitivity (feeling) during sex.

Activation your pelvic floor muscles - This is executed by contracting the same muscles and movement as you would when stopping the flow of urine. Breathe freely during the exercise and try not to engage your abdominal muscles while contracting your pelvic muscles. Try incorporating the activation of pelvic floor muscles while performing key core exercises like the plank, bridge, bird dog even Squats.

QUADRATUS LUMBORUM:

The quadrates lumborum originates at the iliac crest and inserts into the last rib. It’s a large muscle in the middle & Lower back. You use this portion of your back when you bend over to the side and pick something up. You also activate your quadratus lumborum when you sit, stand or walk. Quadratus Lumborum has two muscle functions: to hold your lowest rib steady as you breathe and to flex the body's torso to each side of the body.
You can strengthen your quadratus lumborum muscle using the "side plank" exercise. And stretch this muscle with “cat and camel” exercise

Transversus abdominis aka (TVA):

Originates from the inguinal ligament, iliac crest, thoraco lumbar facia and rib 7th to 12th. And inserts xiphoid process, linea Alba, pubic crest. To simplify this in layman’s term, the transverse abs run from our sides to the front its fibers running horizontally. The transverses abdominis (TVA) helps to compress the ribs and viscera, providing thoracic and pelvic stability.
TVA muscles can be activated by imagining the analogy ‘Getting ready to be punched in the stomach’. So you not going to suck the belly in creating a vacuum, but compress the abdominals tightening it like a defense. The TVA muscles can be strengthened in any / every exercise (even during walking OR sitting upright) just by activating them in the above mentioned method. Try activating the TVA in key core exercises like the plank, bridge, bird dog etc to maximize benefits



Cardio machines


Hoist - Weight Machines

Free Weights


Time to Get in-shape....

ALL FIT at Blue Seven
Batu 4, Jalan Penampang
88100 Kota Kinabalu.
Call...088-701 828

Everydayfoodilove.cowww.foodloh.com team: Thank you for reading our posts. Our team media coverage touches mostly on lifestyle events and focuses on happening scenes in Kuala Lumpur and Kota Kinabalu. Invite us for food reviews, travel and hotel reviews, KL clubbing reviews and product launches. Our other interests include the movies, technology and photography. Subscribe to my facebook page. Contact us via my email at: angel_line78@hotmail.com or monicaong@hotmail.com
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